Role of women elizabethan era essay

Or, if you will marry, make it a fool, by Mary, for wise men know well enough what monsters you make of them. It was not always clear what happened to these estates when the woman married i. Women in the time period of Hamlet were not considered equal to men. She was used to depending on her father, even asking him to think for her.

Hamlet insists that women are weak. It was believed that women always needed someone to look after them. All titles would pass from father to son or brother to brother, depending on the circumstances. Parents did love their daughters and saw them as precious gifts from God.

This allowed Mary, and then Elizabeth, to reign. Women were inferior to men. Acting was considered dishonourable for women and women did not appear on the stage in England until the seventeenth century. It is interesting to note that while the rest of the women citizenry of England during what people call the Golden Age were given to the decisions of the male members in their family and were only limited to household duties, it was a woman who sat on the throne as queen of the land.

It was mainly single women who were accused of being witches by their neighbours. Men were totally in control. Marriage generally lasted as long as the couple both lived.

Women were considered objects of beauty. The Renaissance brought with it a new way of thinking. If they were married, their husband was expected to look after them. Women, regardless of social position, were not allowed to vote however, only men of a certain social position were allowed to vote.

It was not surprising, therefore, that most women married. Before, women were able to become nuns and look forward to a rewarding life in convents, perhaps be a Mother Superior one day.

What was the role of women in the Elizabethan era, as portrayed in Hamlet.

Otherwise, they had to stay home and learn to run the household. If he did abuse his wife, then he could be prosecuted or prevented from living with her. Normally, it was a male who made decisions for the Elizabethan era women, without as much as a consultation with or affirmation from the women involved.

Of all the children Thomas More had, his daughter Margaret was his favourite, and William Cecil was a devoted father to all his children, male and female.The Roles of Women in the Elizabethan Era Facts about Women's Roles Roles of women in society were very limited. Many women in this period were highly educated, women could to go to school or college, but they could be educated at home by private tutors.

Therefore this essay, through the use of organized information, tries to show the role of the Elizabethan women, the perception that Jane Austen had about them and the examples that “Pride and Prejudice” delivers in relation to this.

The Elizabethan Era was the “golden age” of English society with the thriving of poetry, literature and art. Ranging from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, to Gustilio’s Gapio’s paintings, the era was filled with great advances in many areas. Even though there was an unmarried woman on the throne in Elizabethan England, the roles of women in society were very limited.

The Life and Roles of Elizabethan Era Women

The Elizabethans had very clear expectations of men and women, and in general men were expected to be the breadwinners and women to be housewives and mothers.

Women and Children in the Elizabethan Era Essay. Length: words ( double-spaced pages) Rating: Better Essays. Open Document. Essay Preview. During the Elizabethan time period women were considered the weaker sex.

They were thought to always need a man in charge of them. The man in charge of her could be her father. Most accounts of women living in the Elizabethan Era present them as members of society who were designated to do little more than take care of their homes, raise children and tend to the needs of their men.

In this time period, a woman's role was decided by her husband and the type of society she /5(2).

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Role of women elizabethan era essay
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