We have no time to stand and stare

Nonetheless, it was an experience I will never forget. I have had to respond rapidly to these landscapes, generally foreign to my own personal paradigm and I recognise that my experience is very different to the people who have known the country all of their lives.

I believe that part of its major appeal is simply that you do not have to strain to understand it and again, its lesson is true for all times. Surely, it will be a poor life indeed if we pack our lives so full of care that we have no time for leisure.

On escaping the main trunkway relief was unfortunately soon replaced by rising blood pressure once again as we met the multiple caravans and campavans making their way slowly through the Trossachs, seemingly on their way to nowhere in particular.

Since from that first time I read it, it has left a lasting impression; an impression that has not waned even now that I am in my late fifties. Monday morning offered a hint of the stress that I had been trying to escape from as we found ourselves rushing to catch the car ferry from Oban.

As somebody who grew up with Essex marshes and big skies, the north fascinates and excites me as a place that is very largely foreign to my consciousness of personal experience. In this modern age we do not have even a second for our-selves. We were on our way to Fishnish to catch the ferry off the island at the time so it was a fitting end to our time on Mull.

Action-good, Inaction-bad appears the motto of the majority.

Leisure - Poem by William Henry Davies

Nonetheless, I think that his words emanate with popular consciousness of the place today for northerners or many southerners alike, as they have for much of the time since he wrote them in Being Scotland, the weather was highly changeable but generally speaking we were incredibly fortunate and were able to experience some beautiful skies, especially at sunset.

Talking about Beauty as an abstraction is just lazy. The trafficless road meant that we could trundle along slowly, as the stunning raptor flew above us.

We have no time to stand and stare....

This problem, which is plaguing the society, is not a new one. We are so busy making money and trying to improve our finances that we have no time left to enjoy the fruits of our labours.

We were on our way to the Isle of Mull, famously home to the white tailed eagles that I was keen to spot. We need to have time for our selves, to be quiet, to be alone, to unwind, to receive as well as to give.

Contemplation is a human need. This experience was just one of many memorable moments from my recent Scottish adventure. As a rather typical southerner, before last week I was yet to travel further north than Edinburgh and the Firth of Forth. Now days we are gaining knowledge and wealth of money but loosing our wealth of relationship, sharing and bonding with people.

The excitement was palpable as we both realised it was a golden eagle, my first sighting of this glorious bird of prey in the wild. Lunchtime means, some kind of fast food, taken from the freezer, thrown into the microwave owen and eaten quickly while working on the Internet.

The law of the jungle prevails; it is the survival of the fittest. They are always rushing around doing something. There is pressure on everyone, and under these circumstances we cannot expect to have the desire for silence, prayer or contemplation. Perhaps it is a truth towards cultural landscape, sustaining a pride in the way such landscape continues to shape the way in which we see the region.

To survive in this mad rat race everyone is working hard.

Leisure (poem)

The river will come later we hardly even notice the bridge on which we are. Of course, he was not a northerner himself, being an east midlander Lincolnshire by birth and spending much of his life in either Cambridge, London or the Isle of Wight. We do not even have time to eat meals.

Thankfully we caught the ferry from Oban with minutes to spare. Thomas, to find out what you should be looking at! In an earlier comment I described the final stanzas as un-PC since they seemed to refer to staring at an actual female beauty but the more I recite this poem the more I feel that Mother Nature is the beauty at which he is staring.

We get so bogged down with this idea that we do not notice nature and all its glorious, pristine creations. I stopped the car and grabbed the binoculars.“Leisure What is this life if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare? — No time to stand beneath the boughs And stare as long as sheep or cows.

Leisure. by W. H. Davies (). What is this life if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare. No time to stand beneath the boughs And. Jun 12,  · In it he asked, ‘What is this life if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare.’ Though these lines were written more than half a century before but their meaning holds good even today.

In this modern age. We have no time to stand and stare So take a few minutes to stand and stare as often as you can.

Look for beauty and wonder in your world and spend some time gazing at it and enjoying the view. Sep 02,  · We have no time to stand and stare. No time to stand beneath the boughs And stare as long as sheep or cows. No time to see, when woods we pass, Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.

No time to see, in broad daylight, Streams full of stars, like skies at night. Leisure William Henry Davies. What is this life if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare. No time to stand beneath the boughs And stare as long as sheep or cows.

No time to see, when woods we pass, Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass. No time to see, in broad daylight.

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We have no time to stand and stare
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